Faith, Hope, Reality and Despair at Walgreens


I received an e-mail yesterday saying my prescription was ready at Walgreens. I faithfully got in my car drove the 5 miles and after seeing 5 cars in the drive through, and knowing that at least one, had someone my age, who would be confused or argue with the window flunky that the prescription was too expensive I decided to go inside hoping to save a few minutes. Once inside passing by several inmates who had mistaken Walgreens for Wal-Mart I made it to the pharmacy counter hoping for a quick turn around. Upon reaching the counter I was filled with despair when I was told that the prescription they had e-mailed was ready, was not ready and it would be a few minutes. So I sat down wondering exactly what a few minutes meant but sure that it would be defined by my stay. I sat down in the “comfortable” plastic chair they so kindly provided in the waiting area, I sat in the faith that they would indeed fill the prescription in a few minutes. 27 minutes later, my hope almost gone after listening to 12 adults who had just been breathing on me pick up prescriptions for anti-biotics and while sitting next to 4 obviously sick kids I still had hope that I would get the prescription rather than something that required a new prescription. Now after you have sat for 27 minutes the issue becomes that you have already spent 30 minutes plus drive time. Should you leave in despair of ever being served or wait another 5 minutes and if you wait another 5 minutes would not logic indicate that you should stay another 5 minutes after that until you get what you came for. Reality sets in so you decide to set up an artificial zero tolerance guideline. You decide that the guy in the leather jacket is your limit, currently 5th in line behind two people who should have known better than to buy a North Slope jacket in that size. You think I’ll let fate decide, if he gets to the cash register before they call my name your leaving and so he made it to the cash register and I left facing the reality that tomorrow was another day and that they probably called my name just as I opened my car door outside. I wonder is this an allegory or parable for my life or simply how infectious diseases actually spread.

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About safrisri

I was a school teacher until retirement. I have taught at all educational levels from pre-school to college. My college degree is general science which I arrived at after 5 years and 5 different majors. A degree as it turns out, almost as valuable and in demand as one in Neo-Bulgarian Mythology. I have been around education for around 40 years and can remember when teaching was a pleasant, happy and creative job and our schools were the same. Now I'm the guy sitting on the porch with an opinion on everything.
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One Response to Faith, Hope, Reality and Despair at Walgreens

  1. Wendy Prigge says:

    Just Friday I had almost the exact same experience at Walgreens. Since they are always busy and are obviously raking in lots of $$, couldn’t they hire a few more employees to actually wait on people? I had back surgery and can’t stand comfortably; it is difficult for me to stand in line for 10 or 15 minutes every time I go in (often). I guess I’ll use the “drive-through” and burn extra gas while I wait in the car line! They are always polite and pleasant when I finally get up to the window, but I check to make sure my Rx is ready ahead of time. Otherwise, the wait is REALLY long. Long enough to shop every isle. Text messages help, but a message doesn’t always come through for some reason. Then, every time I need a doctor’s approval, it is days and days before the Rx gets filled. (I don’t know whose fault that is.) All I know is, it’s quite a racket and it’s a form of torture if you’re old and don’t feel good. It takes multiple phone calls to fill a simple refill request. Ugh.

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